BioEnergy Lists: Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves

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May 1998 Biomass Cooking Stoves Archive

For more messages see our 1996-2004 Biomass Stoves Discussion List Archives.

From english at adan.kingston.net Fri May 1 07:09:17 1998
From: english at adan.kingston.net (*.English)
Date: Tue Aug 31 21:35:53 2004
Subject: celebrate May 1
In-Reply-To: <199804301209.QAA29506@ns.alkor.ru>
Message-ID: <199805011116.HAA19482@adan.kingston.net>

 

> Dear stovers,
> Tradition to celebrate May 1 as day of international solidarity was born in
> America. Though kommunists also have made this day by the holiday, but it
> is good day, fore to recollect the friends all over the world and to wish
> success and prosperity.
> I shall celebrate this day, recollecting the new friends, which has found
> through a network.
> Kind health, happiness and successes by all to you
> Sincerely Jury Judkevitch (Rossia)

Thank you Dr Jury, for your hope and optimism.

Cheers, Alex

 

>
>
Alex English
RR 2 Odessa Ontario
Canada K0H 2H0
Tel 1-613-386-1927
Fax 1-613-386-1211
Stoves Web Site http://www1.kingston.net/~english/Stoves.html

 

From dstill at epud.org Fri May 1 15:56:28 1998
From: dstill at epud.org (Dean Still)
Date: Tue Aug 31 21:35:53 2004
Subject: Guatemalan stoves
Message-ID: <199805012001.NAA02109@epud.org>

Dear Ted,

It sounds like you have a great project going. The people seem to be
getting something that they want. Congratulations! As far as fuel
efficiency, perhaps this is not the first concern? I spent ten years in a
little village of 40 people in Mexico and introduced a bunch of stuff:
stoves, solar ovens, fuel efficient bread ovens, etc.

One day I was making something for myself: a box out of ferrocement to keep
the ants and rats out of my food. Suddenly everyone wanted to have one and
wanted to learn how to make one themselves. A box was wanted more than the
more fancy stuff I had introduced.

So when I said to make and test the hayboxes I meant that maybe a gentle
approach could be used where the people involved actually design the
hayboxes and experiment themselves with how to make them. I found this
approach to work pretty well.

Dean

----------
> From: spanish@xel.net
> To: dstill@epud.org
> Subject: Guatemalan stoves
> Date: Friday, May 01, 1998 7:09 AM
>
> Dear Friend,
>
> I read with interest your comments about the Lorena stove. Our stove box
> has ashes on the floor of the box and four inch thick clay bricks on the
> sides. Our base is an adobe base elevated up about 30". The stove top is
> all metal because of the request of the Indian families. It cost a lot
> less to make the top with bricks with the pots sticking down into the
fire
> than to use a metal top. They all wanted the metal tops because they
said
> they wouldn't burn their hands as much. They said, the Lorena stove with
> the cooking pot holes, the flame would come around the edges and often
burn
> their hands. They also said they liked the all metal top because they
> could cook a lot of tortillas all at one time on the top. I told them
the
> Lorena stove with the cooking holes in the brick would use less fuel but
> they still wanted the metal tops so last year we gave them 150 metal
tops,
> chimneys and metal doors.
>
> Dr. Schmidt has figures on cooking times using an insulated box and if
they
> differ from the information, I have requested from Aprovecho, then I will
> let you know, as maybe he knows something that you might be interested
in.
> If you wish to send me your address, I will send you copies of
information
> that he gave me along with information from Dr. Schulz regarding
Rootfuel.
> Ted Keller, P.O. Box 592, Effingham, Ill. 62401 Fax 217-857-6615, Tel
> 217-857-3542 TED
> P.S. I didn't know what you meant by your last question, "Did they cook?"

 

From rhari at hotmail.com Sat May 2 04:18:34 1998
From: rhari at hotmail.com (Hari kumar)
Date: Tue Aug 31 21:35:53 2004
Subject: Re. Hello from Aprovecho Research Center
Message-ID: <19980502082535.12007.qmail@hotmail.com>

Dear Stovers,

In Kerala, the God's own country in the southern part of India, the
insulated box is in use for quite a long time using hay as the
insulating material. It has its own problems which made it not popular
among the present generation. Now, we, at the Energy Management Centre
- Kerala, has developed a new low cost version of the insulated box
using Thermocole as the insulating material. The design of some private
parties are costly; thermocole is sandwiched between SS/alloy based
vessel. The EMC model use laminated boards as the enclosure. It has
been tested and shows good results in rice cooking.

R. Harikumar
Energy Management Centre
Karamana P.O, Trivandrum 695 002
e-mail: rhari@hotmail.com
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Date: Tue, 28 Apr 1998 14:35:14 -0500 (GMT)
From: "Priyadarshini Karve(SBO)" <gpk@physics.unipune.ernet.in>
To: stoves@crest.org
Subject: Re: Re. Hello from Aprovecho Research Center

Dear Stovers,
The concept of using an insulated haybox for cooking is an
ingenious idea.
In India, we have been promoting the use of a similar box mainly
for keeping the food warm. It has also been successfully used as a rice
cooker. The stove is used for bringing the water to boil and thereafter
the cooking pot is transferred to the hot box wherein the rice gets
cooked. The device has enjoyed moderate popularity in the Coastal areas
of
Maharashtra where rice is the main food.
Our box is made of two aluminium containers(the like of which are
commonly used for grain storage and can be bought from any household
goods
shop), one container of a smaller diameter than the other. The smaller
container is placed inside the bigger one and the space between their
walls is filled with well packed sawdust which acts as the insulation.
The
lid too can be similarly insulated.
I will request my colleagues working on stove designs to carry out
some trials to find out whether the box can be used for cooking
vegetables, etc.

priyadarshini Karve.

 

______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

 

From tmiles at teleport.com Mon May 4 14:09:51 1998
From: tmiles at teleport.com (Tom Miles)
Date: Tue Aug 31 21:35:53 2004
Subject: Automatic Stoker for Wood chip, wood pellets corn ect. Looking for importers
Message-ID: <199805041817.LAA00346@radius1.teleport.com>

 

>
> Stovers:

This message was posted to the Bioenergy List. It looks like a company that
should be on the list.

Regards,

Tom Miles
Bioenergy Lists Administrator
===============

Date: Mon, 4 May 1998 04:07:50 -0400 (EDT)
>
> From: "Rene Haugesen"
> To: "crest"
> Subject: Automatic Stoker for Wood chip, wood pellets corn ect. Looking for
> importers
> Date: Mon, 4 May 1998 10:12:27 +0200
>
> The PH-Stoker is a 100% Danish produced heating system manufactured by =
> thecompany PRIMDAL HAUGESEN I/S.The PH-Stoker has a degree of =
> efficiency of 92% and a Co number of < 0,004. This is the best numbers =
> of any approved system on the market! Further more,the PH-Stoker is one =
> of the only systems on the Danish market, which is tested and approved =
> for the use of wood-chip as fuel. Efficiency at low yield 95%
>
> At a low yield (9 kW) the PH-Stoker has an efficiency of 95%. This makes =
> the product quite unique as the normal degree of efficiency here falls =
> quite dramatically. For the user this means a better heating economy as =
> the system
>
> only seldom are strained to the full. These factors all give a good =
> heating economy. Technical informations: Effect: 47/ 9kW Fuel: Sawdust, =
> wood chip, wood pellets ect.
>
> At the moment we are looking for importers in your country.
>
> Primdal Haugesen i/s
>
> Holstebrovej 88
>
> 7600 Struer Denmark
>
> tlf 045-86450082 fax 045-8799344
>
> email: rene@ph-stoker.dk
>
> Please take a look off our new homepage !!! Now in English !!! =
> <http://www.ph-stoker.dk/>http://www.ph-stoker.dk

 

 

 

From rmiranda at sdnnic.org.ni Mon May 4 15:56:32 1998
From: rmiranda at sdnnic.org.ni (Rogerio Miranda)
Date: Tue Aug 31 21:35:54 2004
Subject: Guatemalan stoves
In-Reply-To: <199805012001.NAA02109@epud.org>
Message-ID: <3.0.2.16.19980503200741.361f7958@ns.sdnnic.org.ni.>

 

>----------
>> From: spanish@xel.net
>> To: dstill@epud.org
>> Subject: Guatemalan stoves
>> Date: Friday, May 01, 1998 7:09 AM
>>
>> Dear Friend,
>>
>> I read with interest your comments about the Lorena stove. Our stove box
>> has ashes on the floor of the box and four inch thick clay bricks on the
>> sides. Our base is an adobe base elevated up about 30". The stove top is
>> all metal because of the request of the Indian families. It cost a lot
>> less to make the top with bricks with the pots sticking down into the
>fire
>> than to use a metal top. They all wanted the metal tops because they
>said
>> they wouldn't burn their hands as much. They said, the Lorena stove with
>> the cooking pot holes, the flame would come around the edges and often
>burn
>> their hands. They also said they liked the all metal top because they
>> could cook a lot of tortillas all at one time on the top. I told them
>the
>> Lorena stove with the cooking holes in the brick would use less fuel but
>> they still wanted the metal tops so last year we gave them 150 metal
>tops,
>> chimneys and metal doors.
>>
>> Dr. Schmidt has figures on cooking times using an insulated box and if
>they
>> differ from the information, I have requested from Aprovecho, then I will
>> let you know, as maybe he knows something that you might be interested
>in.
>> If you wish to send me your address, I will send you copies of
>information
>> that he gave me along with information from Dr. Schulz regarding
>Rootfuel.

Hi. This stove is being promote by PROLENA in Tegucigalpa, Honduras as
"Plancha Stove" or plate stove. Besides the reasons above mention, also
people liked it because the indoor air quality is much better, since it is
closed with smoke getting out only trough the chimney. Manuel Tay in
Guatemala has a busines manufacturing the plates.

Rogerio
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
Rogerio Carneiro de Miranda
ATP/PROLENA/Nicaragua
Apartado Postal C-321
Managua, Nicaragua
telefax (505) 276 2015
EM <rmiranda@sdnnic.org.ni>
<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

 

From gpk at physics.unipune.ernet.in Tue May 5 02:57:34 1998
From: gpk at physics.unipune.ernet.in (Priyadarshini Karve(SBO))
Date: Tue Aug 31 21:35:54 2004
Subject: the hotbox
In-Reply-To: <19980502082535.12007.qmail@hotmail.com>
Message-ID: <Pine.SOL.3.96.980505114656.15598A-100000@physics>

Dear Stovers,
This is specially to thank Dr. Dean Still for reminding us of the
haybox/hotbox concept. It seems to have generated a lot of discussion
within the group too.
I discussed the concept with our Senior Scientific Officer of the
Stoves research programme, Mr. R.D. Hanbar. He has been in charge of the
Technical Back up Unit for the Improved Stoves programme for more than ten
years although the unit got associated with our Institute just a couple of
years back. He said that in the early days of the TBU he had experimented
with the hotbox concept. He too found that lightweight insulators like
hay, groundnut shells and thermocole work the best. The hotbox had been
found to be very useful in cooking rice, beans, pulses and vegetables.
However, similar to the experience of Mr. Harikumar in Kerala, Mr.
Hanbar too found that the concept failed to become popular. He had
supplied several families with the boxes on an experimental basis. A
feedback survey conducted after a few months revealed that the boxes were
being used either as ordinary containers or, worse still, as chairs for
children to sit upon! As a result, with time, the concept went down in the
priority list of the TBU activities. As I mentioned earlier, it has found
limited use among the rice-eating households.
But now that we are reminded of this excellent energy saving
device once again, we have decided to give it another try. We are more
confident of success this time due to the experience accumulated over the
years, of convincing people to accept new concepts. In order to prevent
the other uses of the hotbox we are thinking of making it a part of the
cookstove itself. You may have seen the drawing of our two pothole stove
on the website maintained by Mr. English. We are now making a prototype
wherein the second pothole will be replaced by a cavity with an insulated
lid. We feel that the cavity with its walls of clay and warmed by the
vicinity of the fire under the first pot hole would serve quite well as a
hotbox.
If this succeeds we would have introduced a new stove model
incorporating an entirely new concept. So thank you once again, Dr.Still.

Priyadarshini Karve.

 

 

From english at adan.kingston.net Wed May 6 17:02:26 1998
From: english at adan.kingston.net (*.English)
Date: Tue Aug 31 21:35:54 2004
Subject: (Fwd) BOUNCE stoves@crest.org: Non-member submission from [
Message-ID: <199805062110.RAA14318@adan.kingston.net>

------- Forwarded Message Follows -------
From: owner-stoves@crest.org
Date: Wed, 6 May 1998 16:02:32 -0400 (EDT)
To: owner-stoves@crest.org
Subject: BOUNCE stoves@crest.org: Non-member submission from ["Berube, Conrad" <CABERUBE@nanaimo.env.gov.bc.ca>]

From: "Berube, Conrad" <CABERUBE@nanaimo.env.gov.bc.ca>

A friend is hoping to pass along plans for fuel efficient stoves for use by
a Tibetan enclave refuged in India-- are there any plans/instructions for
lorena or tandoor stoves available on the internet?

/|/|
| | | Conrad Berube
| | | Pest Management Officer
\|\| B.C. Environment, Lands
>{}{}{}{}<++>8 and Parks
/|/| 2080-A Labieux Road
| | | Nanaimo, BC V9T 6J6
| | | (250)751-3100; FAX:(250) 751-3103
\|\| email: caberube@nanaimo.env.gov.bc.ca

 

 

From dstill at epud.org Wed May 6 18:48:32 1998
From: dstill at epud.org (Dean Still)
Date: Tue Aug 31 21:35:54 2004
Subject: (Fwd) BOUNCE stoves@crest.org: Non-member submission from [
Message-ID: <199805062256.PAA19611@epud.org>

Dear Mr. Berube-

Tests performed at Aprovecho Research Center and other facilities have
shown that the Lorena stove is usually less fuel efficient than an indoor
open fire. Open fires can be quite efficient, actually, when users are
concerned with saving fuel. The Lorena has other benefits, removal of smoke
is one of them. Basically a good stove forces the user to be more
conserving. Insulation around the combustion area can improve efficiency of
combustion. But real fuel savings can occur by improving the amount of heat
that enters the pot: either by adding a skirt around the pot or by placing
the pot full of boiling food into a well insulated, relatively air tight
box.

----------
> From: *.English <english@adan.kingston.net>
> To: stoves@crest.org
> Subject: (Fwd) BOUNCE stoves@crest.org: Non-member submission from [
> Date: Wednesday, May 06, 1998 3:08 PM
>
> ------- Forwarded Message Follows -------
> From: owner-stoves@crest.org
> Date: Wed, 6 May 1998 16:02:32 -0400 (EDT)
> To: owner-stoves@crest.org
> Subject: BOUNCE stoves@crest.org: Non-member submission from
["Berube, Conrad" <CABERUBE@nanaimo.env.gov.bc.ca>]
>
>
> From: "Berube, Conrad" <CABERUBE@nanaimo.env.gov.bc.ca>
>
>
> A friend is hoping to pass along plans for fuel efficient stoves for use
by
> a Tibetan enclave refuged in India-- are there any plans/instructions for
> lorena or tandoor stoves available on the internet?
>
> /|/|
> | | | Conrad Berube
> | | | Pest Management Officer
> \|\| B.C. Environment, Lands
> >{}{}{}{}<++>8 and Parks
> /|/| 2080-A Labieux Road
> | | | Nanaimo, BC V9T 6J6
> | | | (250)751-3100; FAX:(250) 751-3103
> \|\| email: caberube@nanaimo.env.gov.bc.ca
>

 

From powerco1 at harare.iafrica.com Fri May 8 15:00:30 1998
From: powerco1 at harare.iafrica.com (Power Construction)
Date: Tue Aug 31 21:35:54 2004
Subject: Charcoal Briquetting - machinery / equipment / method
Message-ID: <199805081900.PAA10300@solstice.crest.org>

Please can you advise whom i may contact for the following information
:-
Machinery and Equipment
I am looking for a manufacturer of charcoal briquetting machines.

Regards
Stuart Maclean
powerco1@harare.iafrica.com

 

 

From english at adan.kingston.net Tue May 12 16:39:13 1998
From: english at adan.kingston.net (*.English)
Date: Tue Aug 31 21:35:54 2004
Subject: (Fwd) BOUNCE stoves@crest.org: Admin request of type /\bsu
Message-ID: <199805122046.QAA14555@adan.kingston.net>

------- Forwarded Message Follows -------
From: owner-stoves@crest.org
Date: Tue, 12 May 1998 12:21:58 -0400 (EDT)
To: owner-stoves@crest.org
Subject: BOUNCE stoves@crest.org: Admin request of type /\bsubscribe\b/i at line 9

From: "Dan Campbell" <CAMPBELLDB@cdm.com>
To: stoves@crest.org
Subject: Listserver on health impacts of indoor air pollution

Dear Colleagues:

The USAID Environmental Health Project recently installed a listserver or
electronic mailing list for the Acute Respiratory Infections(ARI)Network.
Subscribing to this list will enable you to post messages to and receive
messages from all members of the ARI Network. We hope to also have an
electronic conference on ARI topics in the near future.

To subscribe, send an email to: arilist@erols.com

In the Subject line, type in: ari-subscribe

Once you have subscribed, you will receive further instructions on posting
messages, unsubscribing, etc. This listserver will replace the messages and
notes from my email address, so please subscribe if you wish to remain a
member of the network.

Below are some notes from a new ARI member in South Africa and a recent
study
from Taiwan.
****************************************************

From: Joe Asamoah, South Africa
email: joe@mepta.pwv.gov.za

I would like to give you a brief description of my work.
I manage the South Africa National Low-Smoke Fuel Programme. This
programme aims to introduce clean burning, more environmental
friendly and healthier fuels into the Townships in South Africa. The
domestic sector consumes about 3% of the total coal utilised in the
country, yet produces approximately 24% of the particulate emissions.
The incidence of air pollution in Townships gives rise to acute
respiratory diseases, reduce visibility and is a nuisance to the
environment. It is believed that the introduction of low-smoke fuels
in Townships, would ameliorate the situation. It is planned to
introduce the low-smoke fuels into the Townships the in year 2000.

The programme also aims to encourage the use of other more
environmentally friendly fuels into the Township and calls for an
Integrated Approach in addressing the air pollution burden. A
decision support model is also being developed for the programme.
This model would assist us to predict the emissions and other effects
when the energy mix, mode of combustion of fuels, housing types,
population density etc. are known. The programme has completed research on

the technical, social, economic and health impacts of the new fuels
on the society. A policy may be developed soon on the use of clean
fuels in the Townships. I hope that this is what you need for now.
Please feel free to come back to me on any other issue. Thank you.

*****************************************

Yang, C. Y. and others. October 1997. Effects of Indoor Environmental
Factors
on Respiratory Health of Children in a Subtropical Climate. Environmental
Research 75, no. 1: 49-55.

This study was conducted to determine whether indoor environmental factors
affected respiratory symptoms in 4164 primary school children in Kaohsiung
rural areas of Taiwan. Information on respiratory health symptoms and
characteristics of the housing was obtained using a written questionnaire,
completed by the parents of children. Multiple logistic regression analysis

examined the relationship between respiratory health symptoms (cough,
wheezing, bronchitis, asthma, and allergic rhinitis) and housing factors.
Home

dampness was significantly associated with all respiratory health symptoms.

Incense burning and mosquito repellant burning showed effects on the
reporting

of coughing symptoms. No apparent associations were found with the other
indoor factors included in this study or respiratory health symptoms. We
conclude that dampness in the home has a pronounced effects on respiratory
health symptoms and is a new public health issue in subtropical areas.

 

 

 

From dstill at epud.org Wed May 13 01:58:51 1998
From: dstill at epud.org (Dean Still)
Date: Tue Aug 31 21:35:54 2004
Subject: testing of Rocket stove
Message-ID: <199805130609.XAA08034@epud.org>

 

Dear Alex,

I note the interest around the world concerning the link between smoke
inhalation and medical problems. Could you or anyone else test a Rocket
stove for carbon monoxide, etc? I don't have equipment here at Aprovecho
and it would be interesting to know the results. I could mail anyone a
Rocket stove UPS.

Dean Still
> From: *.English <english@adan.kingston.net>
> To: stoves@crest.org
> Subject: Re: celebrate May 1
> Date: Friday, May 01, 1998 5:15 AM
>
>
>
> > Dear stovers,
> > Tradition to celebrate May 1 as day of international solidarity was
born in
> > America. Though kommunists also have made this day by the holiday, but
it
> > is good day, fore to recollect the friends all over the world and to
wish
> > success and prosperity.
> > I shall celebrate this day, recollecting the new friends, which has
found
> > through a network.
> > Kind health, happiness and successes by all to you
> > Sincerely Jury Judkevitch (Rossia)
>
>
> Thank you Dr Jury, for your hope and optimism.
>
> Cheers, Alex
>
>
>
> >
> >
> Alex English
> RR 2 Odessa Ontario
> Canada K0H 2H0
> Tel 1-613-386-1927
> Fax 1-613-386-1211
> Stoves Web Site http://www1.kingston.net/~english/Stoves.html

 

From english at adan.kingston.net Wed May 13 07:33:59 1998
From: english at adan.kingston.net (*.English)
Date: Tue Aug 31 21:35:54 2004
Subject: testing of Rocket stove
In-Reply-To: <199805130609.XAA08034@epud.org>
Message-ID: <199805131141.HAA05619@adan.kingston.net>

Dear Dean,
I would be happy to try and test your stove. I am able to get a rough
idea of the combustion dynamic by monitoring CO and CO2.

Testing for exposure to harmful compounds is more complex.
Dr. Kirk Smith of UC- Berkley, leads the way in this field. He is a
sponsor and a member of this mailing list.

Alex

> Dear Alex,
>
> I note the interest around the world concerning the link between smoke
> inhalation and medical problems. Could you or anyone else test a Rocket
> stove for carbon monoxide, etc? I don't have equipment here at Aprovecho
> and it would be interesting to know the results. I could mail anyone a
> Rocket stove UPS.
>
> Dean Still
> > From: *.English <english@adan.kingston.net>
> > To: stoves@crest.org
> > Subject: Re: celebrate May 1
> > Date: Friday, May 01, 1998 5:15 AM
> >
> >
> >
> > > Dear stovers,
> > > Tradition to celebrate May 1 as day of international solidarity was
> born in
> > > America. Though kommunists also have made this day by the holiday, but
> it
> > > is good day, fore to recollect the friends all over the world and to
> wish
> > > success and prosperity.
> > > I shall celebrate this day, recollecting the new friends, which has
> found
> > > through a network.
> > > Kind health, happiness and successes by all to you
> > > Sincerely Jury Judkevitch (Rossia)
> >
> >
> > Thank you Dr Jury, for your hope and optimism.
> >
> > Cheers, Alex
> >
> >
> >
> > >
> > >
> > Alex English
> > RR 2 Odessa Ontario
> > Canada K0H 2H0
> > Tel 1-613-386-1927
> > Fax 1-613-386-1211
> > Stoves Web Site http://www1.kingston.net/~english/Stoves.html
>
>

 

 

From english at adan.kingston.net Thu May 14 06:47:10 1998
From: english at adan.kingston.net (*.English)
Date: Tue Aug 31 21:35:54 2004
Subject: (Fwd) BOUNCE stoves@crest.org: Non-member submission from [
Message-ID: <199805141055.GAA02794@adan.kingston.net>

------- Forwarded Message Follows -------
From: owner-stoves@crest.org
Date: Thu, 14 May 1998 04:59:27 -0400 (EDT)
To: owner-stoves@crest.org
Subject: BOUNCE stoves@crest.org: Non-member submission from [Vladimir Saric <vsaric@ttpp.vra.com>]

From: Vladimir Saric <vsaric@ttpp.vra.com>

Please advise if any charcoal furnace for cocnut shells exists. I would
like to build or buy one. Please advise any information.
Regards, Vladimir

 

 

 

From elk at arcc.or.ke Fri May 15 06:36:50 1998
From: elk at arcc.or.ke (E. L. Karstad)
Date: Tue Aug 31 21:35:54 2004
Subject: The "Stovers" Meeting, Nairobi.
Message-ID: <v01510101b181f1c90a30@[199.2.222.130]>

THE NAIROBI 'STOVERS'

A ROUND TABLE FORUM FOR THOSE INVOLVED IN DEVELOPMENT AND PROMOTION OF
COOKSTOVES

9:30 FRIDAY 29/5/98
SILVER SPRINGS HOTEL, NAIROBI

Dr. Ronal Larson, moderator of the internet stoves group "stoves@crest.org"
will be in town for a short while over the end of this month, and has
suggested that all interested individuals get together for a round table
discussion during his visit.

I have booked the conference facilities of the Silver Springs Hotel
(Argwings Kodhek Rd.) starting from 9:30 a.m. on Friday the 29th May. I
envision a morning session only, but the venue is available for the entire
day should we wish to carry on into the afternoon. Lunch is provided.

We anticipate around 20 people in all, and plan to keep the meeting on an
informal basis. The topic will be... well, stoves! Both development and
promotional issues.

Please respond directly to me confirming your attendance or absence as the
case may be. Can you think of anyone else I should invite? Kindly provide
contacts when you confirm your attendance & I will forward an invitation.

See you there.

Elsen Karstad

Tel: 884436 Fax 884437 Home 891521 elk@arcc.or.ke

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Stovers;

So far, I have extended invitations to:

Maxwell Kinyanjui - a long time stover with charcoal interests

Charles Gitundu & Enos of Rural Technology Enterprises Ltd.

Kimani Muiri of GTZ

Tony Potterton - formerly of the Bellerive Fndn., now of Penroche Dev. Serv.

Githinji - Univ. Nairobi

Steve Karakezi - Fndn. for Woodstove Dissemination

Gitonga - Intermediate Technology Group

Dr. Ben Chikamai - Kenya Forestry Res. Inst.

T.B.A. from Biomass Technology Group B.V.

And of course, Ronal and myself.

That's looking like 12 people so far........ I'm aiming for 15 to 20, so
has anyone any other candidates? Have I missed anyone here?

Regards;

elk

_____________________________
Elsen Karstad
P.O Box 24371 Nairobi, Kenya
Tel/Fax:254 2 884437
E-mail: elk@arcc.or.ke
______________________________

 

 

From dstill at epud.org Fri May 15 18:27:58 1998
From: dstill at epud.org (Dean Still)
Date: Tue Aug 31 21:35:54 2004
Subject: testing of Rocket stove
Message-ID: <199805152233.PAA11326@epud.org>

Dear Mark,

Pleased that you can check out the Rocket stove!! As I said to Alex, I'll
wait until my students arrive and then we'll make the stove and send it to
you. We'll make the same version that was made by refugees in Zaire (a
UNHCR project headed by Barry Wheeler.) A friend is selling these in West
Africa. What's your address?

Thanks, Dean Still

 

From dstill at epud.org Fri May 15 18:28:01 1998
From: dstill at epud.org (Dean Still)
Date: Tue Aug 31 21:35:54 2004
Subject: testing of rocket stove
Message-ID: <199805152233.PAA11323@epud.org>

Dear Alex- Great! Thanks for helping to test the Rocket stove. My new group
of 14 interns arrives June 1 and we'll make two rocket stoves and send them
off for testing that week. Two of the students are from Kenya, one from
Zimbabwe. It is great for them to see research going on and I try to do as
much with them as possible. Where do we send the stove?

Thanks, Dean

 

From kmbryden at iastate.edu Sat May 16 10:44:37 1998
From: kmbryden at iastate.edu (mark bryden)
Date: Tue Aug 31 21:35:54 2004
Subject: testing of Rocket stove
In-Reply-To: <199805152233.PAA11326@epud.org>
Message-ID: <3.0.3.32.19980516095244.00697f80@pop-1.iastate.edu>

Dean,

Sounds good we'll be looking forward to it.

Address

Professor Mark Bryden
Department of Mechanical Engineering
3030 H. M. Black Engineering Building
Ames, Iowa 50011-2161

At 03:37 PM 5/15/98 -0700, you wrote:
>Dear Mark,
>
>Pleased that you can check out the Rocket stove!! As I said to Alex, I'll
>wait until my students arrive and then we'll make the stove and send it to
>you. We'll make the same version that was made by refugees in Zaire (a
>UNHCR project headed by Barry Wheeler.) A friend is selling these in West
>Africa. What's your address?
>
>Thanks, Dean Still
>
_____________________________________________________________________________
Mark Bryden, Ph.D Assistant Professor
Tel: 515-294-3891 Iowa State University
Fax: 515-294-3261 Department of
Mechanical Engineering
3030 H. M. Black Bldg.
Ames, IA 50011-2161

 

 

From celtic2 at ibm.net Sat May 16 22:04:47 1998
From: celtic2 at ibm.net (Stephen Allen)
Date: Tue Aug 31 21:35:54 2004
Subject: Request for information on portable gasifier design.
Message-ID: <199805170212.CAA97714@out1.ibm.net>

Am currently designing and building small scale gasifiers, but am having a
hard time finding relevant information. So far I have been able to run a
small downdraft unit, and been able to draw off a producer gas that burns
very hot, and very blue.
Any info on crossdraft, or updraft designs is appreciated.

Stephen Allen.

 

From REEDTB at compuserve.com Mon May 18 08:01:06 1998
From: REEDTB at compuserve.com (Thomas Reed)
Date: Tue Aug 31 21:35:54 2004
Subject: GAS-L: Thermal Data for Natural and Synthetic Fuels
Message-ID: <199805180808_MC2-3D5E-602E@compuserve.com>

Dear Jeff:

Thank you for your kind words concerning our new book, "THERMAL DATA FOR
NATURAL AND SYNTHETIC FUELS". I have not yet seen a copy of our book, but
I just found it on
www.dekker.com/cgi-bin/webdbc/md/detail.htx?d_cat_id=0070-8. I presume I
will get 10-20 complimentary copies.

I actually started collecting Thermogravimetric data at SERI in 1978, but
got involved with other projects in the 1980s. Sid Gaur and I worked on
this collection of data for NREL starting in 1992 with a brand new Seiko
TGA machine at the Colorado School of Mines. Wonderful machine!

In particular I would like to draw your attention to: the "best yet" data
on the effect of heating rate on TGA results; the new analysis by Sid and
me of the original Arrhenius equation, based on our "best yet" data; and
the large collection of Prox and Ultimate fuel data taken mostly from the
thesis of S. A. Channiwala under Prof. Parikh at IIT Bombay, in the
appendix.

Sorry I can't sell copies of this book through the Biomass Energy Press at
$25 rather than whatever Dekker is asking, but they have done a fine job of
editing.

For better data leading to better understanding, Your Biofriend,
TOM REED

~~~~

Dear Tom Reed:
I just got a flyer in the mail from Marcel Dekker, Inc. announcing the
publication this month of "Thermal Data for Natural and Synthetics Fuels".
The authors are Siddhartha Gaur of VSLR Sciences and one Thomas R. Reed of
the Colorado School of Mines.

Congratulations to our moderator on this significant achievement!

(for more info on the book check out www.dekker.com)

Regards,

Jeff Phillips
Fern Engineering, Inc.
P.O. Box 3380
Pocasset, MA 02559
USA
1-508-563-7181 (phone)
1-508-564-4851 (fax)
www.capecod.net/ferneng
<

 

From english at adan.kingston.net Mon May 18 19:52:53 1998
From: english at adan.kingston.net (*.English)
Date: Tue Aug 31 21:35:54 2004
Subject: (Fwd) BOUNCE stoves@crest.org: Non-member submission from [
Message-ID: <199805190000.UAA26935@adan.kingston.net>

 

From: fritz pichler <f.pichler@tuev-bayern.at>
Reply-To: f.pichler@tuev-bayern.at

hello,

I just picked up your adress and maybe you can give me a solution to my
problem.
I'm looking for an adress where I can get literature/adress/discussion
about emissions of charkoal kilns. In Austria in some places it is an
old craft to produce charcoal in the forests by building up a pile of
wood and burning it under deoxygenation. To do so causes many impact to
the environment specially in organic pollutions (e.g.VOC's). I need
information about these impacts.

Thank's a lot

fritz pichler

 

 

 

From dstill at epud.org Sun May 24 00:19:40 1998
From: dstill at epud.org (Dean Still)
Date: Tue Aug 31 21:35:54 2004
Subject: Alex-Sending a paper
Message-ID: <199805240427.VAA21331@epud.org>

Dear Alex- This is kind of long but I hope of interest. Dean

Diminishing Smoke in Fuel Efficient Cooking Stoves
Aprovecho Research Center
Dean Still

Smoke has been shown to be a serious health hazard. Reducing the amount of
smoke produced by wood burning stoves is obviously beneficial. There are,
perhaps, two major approaches to smoke reduction in the cooking area.
Aprovecho has designed stoves with chimneys (Approach A) that take smoke
outside the walls of a room or (Approach B) tried to design stoves that
burn up most of the smoke, hopefully reducing inhalation of harmful
substances. A sand and clay Lorena stove, for example, transports the smoke
out of the kitchen through a chimney attached to the rear of the stove. A
Rocket stove, on the other hand, attempts to achieve "complete combustion"
in the following manner:

1.) Insulates around the combustion chamber
2.) Limits the cold air cooling the fire
3.) pre-heats the air necessary for combustion
4.) an insulated chimney creates a draft assisting combustion
5.) meters fuel, burning fuel at the end of the sticks
6.) forms a grate out of the firewood (sticks burning side by side create
a hot burn)
7.) escaping smoke passes through flame in the chimney and combusts
8.) a longer chimney, 12" or longer, provides cleaner combustion

If burn temperatures stay above 1,200 F. efficient combustion is likely.
Insulating around the fire allows flame (which is around 2,300 F.) to heat
the whole combustion area above 1,200 F. Surrounding the flame with high
mass materials tends to have the opposite effect: the heavy materials, such
as sand, clay, earth, stay relatively cold and may create a smoky
environment. Light weight insulators such as wood ash, pumice rock,
aluminum foil, etc. help to slow the passage of heat into the stove body.
Temperatures in the combustion chamber can then rise higher.

Smoke Reduction And Fuel Efficiency

Both approaches to smoke reduction can be coupled to design options aimed
at improved fuel efficiency. Heat transfer into the pot greatly determines
the fuel efficiency of the stove. Heat transfer efficiency is achieved by
turning the pot into a better heat exchanger. Good heat exchangers have the
following characteristics:

1.) large surface area
2.) great difference between temperatures: a greater percentage of heat
enters a pot if the heat contacting its surface is as hot as possible
3.) prolong dwell time
4.) high conductivity

Stove designers achieve more efficient heat transfer by forcing the flame
and hot flue gases to efficiently warm the pot. The right gap, which
narrows as it reaches the pot's perimeter, helps to heat the bottom of a
pot. The sides of the pot can be more efficiently heated by placing an
insulated skirt around the pot. The width of the gap is, again, very
important. It's also possible to put an insulated lid over the skirt
thereby passing the heat over the top of the pot. The greatest efficiency
is achieved when the pot is completely warmed on all sides by the hot flue
gases. The pot is then heated in a very hot oven. Any part of this concept
can be coupled with designs that reduce smoke.

The Lorena stove and similar stoves usually direct the flame in a
horizontal tube past the bottom of the pot. The pot covers a hole open to
duct containing flame and heat. The pot keeps smoke inside the stove by
sitting on top of the hole. Sometimes metal surfaces are placed over the
top of such a stove creating a grill or comal.

In both cases, heat transfer efficiency can be improved by A.) having flame
either contact the pot or grill as effectively as possible. As well, if the
heat is not in direct contact with heat absorbing materials such as sand,
clay, earth, etc. more of the wood's heat can be used in heating the pot or
grill. B.) It is important to thermally isolate the heat flow path. These
design considerations do not interfere with smoke reduction while improving
fuel efficiency.

One version of the "New Lorena" stove has an insulated combustion chamber
underneath a short, insulated, vertical chimney that directs flame at the
pot. Flame is in contact with the bottom of the pot instead of merely
passing by it. Flame and hot flue gases then continue underneath a grill in
a wide, one inch deep passageway. The shallow and wide gap under the comal
is insulated from the stove body with wood ash. The insulated gap results
in much more efficient heating of the comal, which saves firewood. Smoke
passes out of the kitchen through a chimney.

Designs Without Chimneys

It is more risky to try for "complete combustion" without a chimney. Any
smoke that escapes burning enters the kitchen. However, it's nice to have
options. Chimneys are expensive and often unavailable. Trying to burn up
the smoke initially can become a 'real world' alternative..

A Rocket stove for sale near Nairobi in Kenya is made with a fired clay
liner. The liner creates the combustion chamber and 9" long chimney. The
liner sits in the middle of a round cement form made with pumice to lighten
the stove. Pumice rock fills in the space between the liner and the stove
body and acts as the insulation. The stove sells for five dollars and costs
two and a half dollars to produce.

Stoves such as these can lessen smoke in the home without the use of a
chimney. But, of course, the stove smokes like any other while cold. Some
smoke is still produced while in use. Feeding too much wood into the stove
does create smoke. And burning green wood cools the fire and creates more
smoke. Nothing can compete with a chimney for removing smoke from a room!
But, design modifications can reduce the problem.

Smoke has always been a concern but recently many authors seem to be
stressing the importance of smoke reduction. Trying to achieve both fuel
efficiency and smoke reduction are possible. In fact, it is possible to
combine both features in a variety of stoves. Trying to achieve "complete
combustion" seems a reasonable goal for all stoves with or without
chimneys.

 

 

 

 

 

 

From english at adan.kingston.net Mon May 25 07:27:50 1998
From: english at adan.kingston.net (*.English)
Date: Tue Aug 31 21:35:54 2004
Subject: Alex-Sending a paper
Message-ID: <199805251135.HAA27439@adan.kingston.net>

 

Dear Dean,
It is of interest, it is right on topic.

It is useful to break the "stove" down into its components. Some
folks have said there will be no one solution which will be the
world's stove. True enough, but if a combustion system which is
clearly superior can be identified, it would likely be possible to
incorporate it into most stoves as the primary heat source.

The non catalytic, EPA approved wood stoves in North America
seem to follow a common approach with the design of their
combustion processes.

I am looking forward to operating the Rocket Stove.

Have you experimented with grates or other ways of improving the
flame mixing or turbulence? The result might be to shorten the flame
and reduce smoke, beyond eliminating visible smoke. That is more
difficult to measure.

Alex

> Dear Alex- This is kind of long but I hope of interest. Dean
>
>
> Diminishing Smoke in Fuel Efficient Cooking Stoves
> Aprovecho Research Center
> Dean Still
>
> Smoke has been shown to be a serious health hazard. Reducing the amount of
> smoke produced by wood burning stoves is obviously beneficial. There are,
> perhaps, two major approaches to smoke reduction in the cooking area.
> Aprovecho has designed stoves with chimneys (Approach A) that take smoke
> outside the walls of a room or (Approach B) tried to design stoves that
> burn up most of the smoke, hopefully reducing inhalation of harmful
> substances. A sand and clay Lorena stove, for example, transports the smoke
> out of the kitchen through a chimney attached to the rear of the stove. A
> Rocket stove, on the other hand, attempts to achieve "complete combustion"
> in the following manner:
>
> 1.) Insulates around the combustion chamber
> 2.) Limits the cold air cooling the fire
> 3.) pre-heats the air necessary for combustion
> 4.) an insulated chimney creates a draft assisting combustion
> 5.) meters fuel, burning fuel at the end of the sticks
> 6.) forms a grate out of the firewood (sticks burning side by side create
> a hot burn)
> 7.) escaping smoke passes through flame in the chimney and combusts
> 8.) a longer chimney, 12" or longer, provides cleaner combustion
>
> If burn temperatures stay above 1,200 F. efficient combustion is likely.
> Insulating around the fire allows flame (which is around 2,300 F.) to heat
> the whole combustion area above 1,200 F. Surrounding the flame with high
> mass materials tends to have the opposite effect: the heavy materials, such
> as sand, clay, earth, stay relatively cold and may create a smoky
> environment. Light weight insulators such as wood ash, pumice rock,
> aluminum foil, etc. help to slow the passage of heat into the stove body.
> Temperatures in the combustion chamber can then rise higher.
>
> Smoke Reduction And Fuel Efficiency
>
> Both approaches to smoke reduction can be coupled to design options aimed
> at improved fuel efficiency. Heat transfer into the pot greatly determines
> the fuel efficiency of the stove. Heat transfer efficiency is achieved by
> turning the pot into a better heat exchanger. Good heat exchangers have the
> following characteristics:
>
>
> 1.) large surface area
> 2.) great difference between temperatures: a greater percentage of heat
> enters a pot if the heat contacting its surface is as hot as possible
> 3.) prolong dwell time
> 4.) high conductivity
>
> Stove designers achieve more efficient heat transfer by forcing the flame
> and hot flue gases to efficiently warm the pot. The right gap, which
> narrows as it reaches the pot's perimeter, helps to heat the bottom of a
> pot. The sides of the pot can be more efficiently heated by placing an
> insulated skirt around the pot. The width of the gap is, again, very
> important. It's also possible to put an insulated lid over the skirt
> thereby passing the heat over the top of the pot. The greatest efficiency
> is achieved when the pot is completely warmed on all sides by the hot flue
> gases. The pot is then heated in a very hot oven. Any part of this concept
> can be coupled with designs that reduce smoke.
>
> The Lorena stove and similar stoves usually direct the flame in a
> horizontal tube past the bottom of the pot. The pot covers a hole open to
> duct containing flame and heat. The pot keeps smoke inside the stove by
> sitting on top of the hole. Sometimes metal surfaces are placed over the
> top of such a stove creating a grill or comal.
>
> In both cases, heat transfer efficiency can be improved by A.) having flame
> either contact the pot or grill as effectively as possible. As well, if the
> heat is not in direct contact with heat absorbing materials such as sand,
> clay, earth, etc. more of the wood's heat can be used in heating the pot or
> grill. B.) It is important to thermally isolate the heat flow path. These
> design considerations do not interfere with smoke reduction while improving
> fuel efficiency.
>
> One version of the "New Lorena" stove has an insulated combustion chamber
> underneath a short, insulated, vertical chimney that directs flame at the
> pot. Flame is in contact with the bottom of the pot instead of merely
> passing by it. Flame and hot flue gases then continue underneath a grill in
> a wide, one inch deep passageway. The shallow and wide gap under the comal
> is insulated from the stove body with wood ash. The insulated gap results
> in much more efficient heating of the comal, which saves firewood. Smoke
> passes out of the kitchen through a chimney.
>
> Designs Without Chimneys
>
> It is more risky to try for "complete combustion" without a chimney. Any
> smoke that escapes burning enters the kitchen. However, it's nice to have
> options. Chimneys are expensive and often unavailable. Trying to burn up
> the smoke initially can become a 'real world' alternative..
>
> A Rocket stove for sale near Nairobi in Kenya is made with a fired clay
> liner. The liner creates the combustion chamber and 9" long chimney. The
> liner sits in the middle of a round cement form made with pumice to lighten
> the stove. Pumice rock fills in the space between the liner and the stove
> body and acts as the insulation. The stove sells for five dollars and costs
> two and a half dollars to produce.
>
> Stoves such as these can lessen smoke in the home without the use of a
> chimney. But, of course, the stove smokes like any other while cold. Some
> smoke is still produced while in use. Feeding too much wood into the stove
> does create smoke. And burning green wood cools the fire and creates more
> smoke. Nothing can compete with a chimney for removing smoke from a room!
> But, design modifications can reduce the problem.
>
> Smoke has always been a concern but recently many authors seem to be
> stressing the importance of smoke reduction. Trying to achieve both fuel
> efficiency and smoke reduction are possible. In fact, it is possible to
> combine both features in a variety of stoves. Trying to achieve "complete
> combustion" seems a reasonable goal for all stoves with or without
> chimneys.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
Alex English
RR 2 Odessa Ontario
Canada K0H 2H0
Tel 1-613-386-1927
Fax 1-613-386-1211
Stoves Webpage
http://www.ikweb.com/enuff/public_html/Stoves.html

 

From btremeer at dds.nl Tue May 26 13:44:32 1998
From: btremeer at dds.nl (Grant Ballard-Tremeer)
Date: Tue Aug 31 21:35:54 2004
Subject: Charcoal usage in Asia or S.America?
Message-ID: <000001bd88ce$6118d5e0$271d1291@blackthorn>

Hi Stovers

Does anyone have contacts with organisations working with charcoal users in
Asia or South America? I'm helping out with a photo study of energy usage
and production world-wide which is being prepared with the support of The
Netherlands Government. It aims to highlight contrasts in the lifestyles of
people producing and using energy all round the world. We already have many
contacts in Africa, and, since we'd like a good spread we're looking for
contacts in other parts of the world.

Can anyone help with suggested contacts?

Regards,
Grant

-------------------
Grant Ballard-Tremeer, PhD, MEM, AMIMechE
btremeer@dds.nl; http://www.ilink.co.za/~grantt: stove emissions study and
some personal info...
-------------------

 

 

 

From tmiles at teleport.com Tue May 26 19:12:42 1998
From: tmiles at teleport.com (Tom Miles)
Date: Tue Aug 31 21:35:54 2004
Subject: Charcoal usage in Asia or S.America?
In-Reply-To: <000001bd88ce$6118d5e0$271d1291@blackthorn>
Message-ID: <199805262320.QAA29592@mail1.teleport.com>

At 07:47 PM 5/26/98 +0200, Grant Ballard-Tremeer wrote:
>Hi Stovers
>
>Does anyone have contacts with organisations working with charcoal users in
>Asia or South America?

TM: A reply from the Environment in Latin America (ELAN) email list:

You may contact the firm FLORESTAL ACESITA in Minas Gerais, Brazil. They
are producing charcoal at a large scale from eucalyphtus in semi-industrial
kilns, using appropriate technology. The charcoal is then used by ACESITA
(an important steel manufacturer) to reduce iron ore to steel. Their
experience has been technically described in FAO's manual #41 (early 1980's)
as a model for charcoal production. I have lost my contact data in ACESITA,
but you may find it in the internet (?), or you may ask FAO. Good luck.

Javier

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Dr. Javier Ver√°stegui
Coordinator, Latin America & CamBioTec-Canada
BIOTECanada
420-130 Albert Street, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1P 5G4
Tel: (613) 563-8849. Fax: (613) 563-8850.
E-mail: javier@biotech.ca <mailto:javier@biotech.ca>
Website: www.biotech.ca <http://www.biotech.ca>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I'm helping out with a photo study of energy usage
>and production world-wide which is being prepared with the support of The
>Netherlands Government. It aims to highlight contrasts in the lifestyles of
>people producing and using energy all round the world. We already have many
>contacts in Africa, and, since we'd like a good spread we're looking for
>contacts in other parts of the world.
>
>Can anyone help with suggested contacts?
>
>Regards,
>Grant
>
>
>-------------------
>Grant Ballard-Tremeer, PhD, MEM, AMIMechE
>btremeer@dds.nl; http://www.ilink.co.za/~grantt: stove emissions study and
>some personal info...
>-------------------
>

 

From bhatta at ait.ac.th Tue May 26 21:20:40 1998
From: bhatta at ait.ac.th (Prof. S.C. Bhattacharya)
Date: Tue Aug 31 21:35:54 2004
Subject: Charcoal usage in Asia or S.America?
In-Reply-To: <000001bd88ce$6118d5e0$271d1291@blackthorn>
Message-ID: <Pine.OSF.3.96.980527082305.30644A-100000@alphaserv.ait.ac.th>

 

Charcoal use for cooking is common in Thailand. Besides household use,
charcoal is also used by food vendors (who set up their food shops in the
evening by the side of the road). Wood charcoal as well as charcoal from
sawdust briquettes are used for this purpose.

We should be able to help with the photo study.

S.C. Bhattacharya
-------------------------------------------------------------------
S. C. Bhattacharya Voice : (66-2) 524 5403 (Off)
Professor 524 5913 (Res)
Energy Program
Asian Institute of Technology Fax : (66-2) 524 5439
PO Box 4, Klong Luang 516 2126
Pathumthani 12120
Thailand e-mail: bhatta@ait.ac.th
-------------------------------------------------------------------

On Tue, 26 May 1998, Grant Ballard-Tremeer wrote:

> Hi Stovers
>
> Does anyone have contacts with organisations working with charcoal users in
> Asia or South America? I'm helping out with a photo study of energy usage
> and production world-wide which is being prepared with the support of The
> Netherlands Government. It aims to highlight contrasts in the lifestyles of
> people producing and using energy all round the world. We already have many
> contacts in Africa, and, since we'd like a good spread we're looking for
> contacts in other parts of the world.
>
> Can anyone help with suggested contacts?
>
> Regards,
> Grant
>
>
> -------------------
> Grant Ballard-Tremeer, PhD, MEM, AMIMechE
> btremeer@dds.nl; http://www.ilink.co.za/~grantt: stove emissions study and
> some personal info...
> -------------------
>
>
>
>

 

 

From dstill at epud.org Wed May 27 02:39:09 1998
From: dstill at epud.org (Dean Still)
Date: Tue Aug 31 21:35:54 2004
Subject: Reply to Thomas Reed
Message-ID: <199805270648.XAA29665@epud.org>

Dear Thomas-

Wow, gasification on a small scale like a cooking stove! I had sensed that
people might have done this by reading the list but would love to
experiment with it. What design would you recommend? How on earth do you
make sure the gases ignite? Can my class build one? Dr. Larry Winiarski,
Aprovecho's engineer, has built a lot of gasifiers and I guess we both
experienced them as temperamental. Please fill us in!

I agree that you are right about the pot cooling the flame and creating
smoke...Larry always tries to have the pot just right above the flames for
this reason. However, we seem to experience in our tests that fuel
efficiency is greatest even with the bit of smoke when the flames lick the
pot. So, perhaps it is a design compromise. I'm sure that you're right,
though, it is most likely best to lower the flame and get rid of the smoke.
The fuel efficiency doesn't suffer very much, anyway.

Thanks!!

Dean

 

From tmiles at teleport.com Wed May 27 20:11:03 1998
From: tmiles at teleport.com (Tom Miles)
Date: Tue Aug 31 21:35:54 2004
Subject: Fwd: Re: Charcoal usage in Asia or S.America?
Message-ID: <Version.32.19980527140751.011382d0@mail.teleport.com>

>X-From_: BPeirce000@aol.com Wed May 27 10:27:09 1998
>From: BPeirce000@aol.com
>Date: Wed, 27 May 1998 13:26:53 EDT
>To: tmiles@teleport.com
>Subject: Re: Charcoal usage in Asia or S.America?
>
>Have you tried Charles Feinstein of The World Bank
>(c.feinstein@worldbank.org)? He is in charge of the climate change program
>and will have many resources in energy usage throughout the world.
>

 

From english at adan.kingston.net Thu May 28 07:25:18 1998
From: english at adan.kingston.net (*.English)
Date: Tue Aug 31 21:35:54 2004
Subject: Reply to Thomas Reed
In-Reply-To: <199805270648.XAA29665@epud.org>
Message-ID: <199805281133.HAA04224@adan.kingston.net>

Dear Dean,
It is very easy to build a small scale temperamental gasifier for
cooking. A tin can and a can opener is all you need to get started.
Just pack small dry wood into a can with a tiny hole in the bottom.
Then lite it on top.

Do you have access to the web? If so check the portions of the web
page listed below, that are from Tom Reed, Elsen Karstad, Dick Boyt
and myself. They are all variations on a theme.

Alex

>
> Wow, gasification on a small scale like a cooking stove! I had sensed that
> people might have done this by reading the list but would love to
> experiment with it. What design would you recommend? How on earth do you
> make sure the gases ignite? Can my class build one? Dr. Larry Winiarski,
> Aprovecho's engineer, has built a lot of gasifiers and I guess we both
> experienced them as temperamental. Please fill us in!
>
> I agree that you are right about the pot cooling the flame and creating
> smoke...Larry always tries to have the pot just right above the flames for
> this reason. However, we seem to experience in our tests that fuel
> efficiency is greatest even with the bit of smoke when the flames lick the
> pot. So, perhaps it is a design compromise. I'm sure that you're right,
> though, it is most likely best to lower the flame and get rid of the smoke.
> The fuel efficiency doesn't suffer very much, anyway.
>
> Thanks!!
>
> Dean
>
>
Alex English
RR 2 Odessa Ontario
Canada K0H 2H0
Tel 1-613-386-1927
Fax 1-613-386-1211
Stoves Webpage
http://www.ikweb.com/enuff/public_html/Stoves.html

 

From REEDTB at compuserve.com Thu May 28 09:02:32 1998
From: REEDTB at compuserve.com (Thomas Reed)
Date: Tue Aug 31 21:35:54 2004
Subject: Rice Husk Bible
Message-ID: <199805280909_MC2-3E6E-8A4C@compuserve.com>

Dear Rice Hull Energy folks:

A team of experts at Louisiana State University in 1997 published a "Study
of Market for Rice Husk-to-Energy Systems and Equipment" by a team of
experts in energy and rice (including me). The book was commisioned by
NREL.

For a copy, call Brett Craig at Louisiana State, 504 388 8349 and leave
your name and mail address. The book is $19.95 + $4 S&H and they will
invoice. They printed 1020 copies, so they won't run out tomorrow. Or
E-mail to bcraig@AGTR.LSU.edu.

This 200 page book is all you will ever need to know about rice hulls. It
is hard bound and well edited. What a deal! Makes you wonder how
commercial scientific presses get $75 to $150 for equivalent books.

Yours truly, THOMAS B.
REED

 

From REEDTB at compuserve.com Thu May 28 09:02:53 1998
From: REEDTB at compuserve.com (Thomas Reed)
Date: Tue Aug 31 21:35:54 2004
Subject: Combustion "bible"
Message-ID: <199805280910_MC2-3E6E-8A4D@compuserve.com>

Dear Energy Mavens:

Most of my adult life I have used the following three technical reference
books as a substitute for an infinite memory:

HANDBOOK OF CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS The CRC Press
Perry's CHEMICAL ENGINEER'S HANDBOOK McGraw Hill
THE MERCK INDEX Merck &Co.

Together they take up 30 cm of shelf space and weight 10 kg and make me an
instant expert on many subjects.

On a recent trip I found a 1970 COMBUSTION HANDBOOK published by North
American Mfg. Co. It had many things not in the above books that I had
lusted for all my life or calculated on my own. (Some of you no doubt have
used it a long time - don't know how I could have missed it so long.) I
Xeroxed many of the tables and wished for the original....

When I got home I checked with Amazon.com and found that there is a new 3rd
edition Volume II (1997) in two volumes. I coughed up $55 (3.95 S&H) for
Volume II and it has just arrived. I guess I'll have to order Volume I, it
is so great!

The Chapter heads in Volume II are: Fuel-burning equipment; combustion
control; Combustin systems; Heat recovery; Process control optimization;
pollutin control; Noise minimization; and Oxygen Enrichment. 120 pages of
tables follow in the appendix.

There have been a number of questions in this forum about the use of oxygen
instead of air for combustion, and when is it justified. Chapter 13 is
"Oxygen Enrichment and Oxy-fuel Firing". It includes a table showing the
capacity, purity, delivery pressure and kWh/ton required for

Cryogenic plants

Bulk liquid purchase

Pressure and Vacuum swing adsorption (molecular sieves)

Membrane separation

It was written by an acquaintance, H. Kobayashi of Praxair, a LARGE
producer of oxygen, formerly Linde.

I highly recommend these volumes to anyone interested in biomass
combustion.

Yours truly, TOM
REED


 

From elk at arcc.or.ke Thu May 28 10:35:44 1998
From: elk at arcc.or.ke (E.L.Karstad)
Date: Tue Aug 31 21:35:54 2004
Subject: First Larson Report-in
Message-ID: <199805281442.RAA10002@arcc.or.ke>

Warning! This is from Ron - not Elsen.

1. Arrived today from Addis. First terminal I have seen since Denver
(e-mail costs are very highin Ethiopia).

2. Elsen has found 20 people coming from around Nairobi for first Nairobi
Stovers Conference.. Dan Kammen will be here. Friday AM open agenda and
maybe some PM. You now have one last day to get here.

3. I leave Saturday AM and will be in Denver on Sunday PM, in case anyone
has messages.

4. I'd appreciate anyone reading this around Denver (I think Tom Reed may
be away) for calling Gretchen (526-9629) in case my daughter misses her
e-mail just sent.

5. Maybe something more after Friday AM.

6. Much impressed with what Elsen has done and is still doing.

Ron Larson
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
-----------------------------------------
Elsen L. Karstad P.O. Box 24371 Nairobi Kenya. Fax (+254 2) 884437 Tel
884436, 882375
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
-----------------------------------------

 

 

From dstill at epud.org Sat May 30 00:56:07 1998
From: dstill at epud.org (Dean Still)
Date: Tue Aug 31 21:35:54 2004
Subject: Dear Thomas Reed
Message-ID: <199805300507.WAA09629@epud.org>

This is like a fanatic collector of Chagall suddenly finding out that whole
other collections of his work are available for viewing...I am very happy
to find all of the work done on wood gas stoves, including that of Dick
Boyt's, my old friend, inventor of the amazing Rotegrity. My class this
summer term will be busy building these stoves! Congratulations everyone on
such great stuff. I'm going to make the Ten Can Stove first and give it to
Larry (Dr. Winiarski, our stove guru) for his birthday.

Dean Still

 

From english at adan.kingston.net Sat May 30 07:23:05 1998
From: english at adan.kingston.net (*.English)
Date: Tue Aug 31 21:35:54 2004
Subject: Ronal
In-Reply-To: <199805300650.JAA05406@arcc.or.ke>
Message-ID: <199805301131.HAA13942@adan.kingston.net>

 

Elsen,
Thank you for the update. Give Ronal my best wishes for a complete
recovery. I hope this will lead to an enjoyable stay in East Africa,
with his wife. He is fortunate to have a friend, like you, there to
assist.

Congratulations on the successful meeting.

Alex

> Great meeting today, with 21 people attending. Lots accomplished & a local
> network begins- or so it looks. I'll post a list of attendees soon, with,
> hopefully a synopsis. All very upbeat & productive.
>
> Except For:
>
> Unfortunately, Ronal collapsed rather dramatically during the meeting & is
> in the Nairobi Hospital (a world-class institution).
>
> What a day. Poor Ronal. He was SO exited about this meeting.
>
> Anyway, this happenned at 11:00 this morning, and I last saw him at 7:00 pm,
> he was wolfing down a hearty meal.
> Gretchin, his wife, is making plans to come out. They (as of current
> expectations) will then proceed on a mini African tour for a couple weeks
> before heading back to the U.S.
>
> I reckon Ronal needs a good long break, and it looks like
> he's coming 'round to that point of view as well.
>
> I'll keep you informed.
>
> Regards from a very tired
>
> elk
>

> ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
> -----------------------------------------
> Elsen L. Karstad P.O. Box 24371 Nairobi Kenya. Fax (+254 2) 884437 Tel
> 884436, 882375
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
> -----------------------------------------
>
>
>
Alex English
RR 2 Odessa Ontario
Canada K0H 2H0
Tel 1-613-386-1927
Fax 1-613-386-1211
Stoves Webpage
http://www.ikweb.com/enuff/public_html/Stoves.html